State Laws & Charts

States’ electronic mandates for child support are all over the map. Some states, for example, mandate that withheld child support be remitted electronically; others don’t. This chart helps you get a handle on the electronic child support landscape.
Federal law sets the ground rules for employing teens, but state law controls the age at which they must obtain age certificates, working papers or parental consent letters and how long you must retain those documents. This information is summarized in this chart.
Direct deposit was once new and novel. Now, most employees do have their pay deposited directly into their bank accounts, but for others, plastic paycards may be an answer.
States usually require that employees voluntarily participate in electronic pay programs. This chart summarizes the states’ direct deposit/paycard rules. “Mandatory” means that a state allows you to make e-payment a condition of employment, if you choose. States that don’t have laws aren’t included.
Make sure your health care information reporting duties are covered with this handy chart.
This chart summarizes states’ unclaimed property laws. Most states require you to report on an employee-by-employee basis, if unclaimed wages exceed a certain threshold, usually $50. Unclaimed wages under the threshold may be reported in the aggregate. To get the full story on your state’s law, consult your state treasurer’s website.
States have their own W-2 e-filing thresholds and specifications. This chart summarizes those requirements.

Hey, kid, get a job!

May 17, 2013

If you’re tempted to say that to the teenagers in your house, and thankful that someone else will be employing them this summer, remember that somewhere out there other parents are saying the very same thing to their teens. And you may end up employing them.