Payroll Today

To help employers, the Families First Coronavirus Response Act and the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act contain three payroll tax credits—1.) the paid sick leave credit, 2.) the FMLA leave credit and 3.) the employee retention credit. These credits are available in one of two ways.
It’s no April Fools’ joke! Quick as jackrabbit, the IRS has released a new draft form and draft instructions for employers that elect to take any of the payroll tax credits contained in the Families First Coronavirus Response Act and the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act.
The IRS is letting the DOL take the lead in interpreting the Families First law. And, according to the DOL’s FAQs, the circumstances under which employees qualify for emergency paid sick leave or paid FMLA leave are more limited than meets the eye.
Employees who are working at home may be both unsettled and bored, so their attention to spam emails may drop, making them perfect bait for a scam. Remind them that vigilance is now more important than ever.
As passed by the Senate, the CARES Act contains the following provisions.
Once National Guard or Reserve units are activated, employers have specific responsibilities under USERRA—the Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act.
Your responsibilities under the Fair Labor Standards Act haven’t been canceled during the COVID-19 crisis. If you’ve sent employees home to work and some of those employees are nonexempt, you have a problem—tracking their work hours under the Fair Labor Standards Act. Here’s what you need to know about the FLSA.
The IRS and the Department of Labor have released preliminary information to employers on the implementation of the FICA tax credit provisions of Families First Coronavirus Response Law (P.L. 116-127). More guidance will be issued this week.
One day after the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (P.L. 116-127) was signed into law, the Senate released S. 3548, the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act—the CARES Act, for short. The Senate will need to negotiate with the House on the final contents of this bill.
The president has signed the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (H.R. 6201). This is the second COVID-19 law to be enacted. A third is under active discussion. The bill expires Dec. 31, 2020. Here is our complete analysis of the paid leave and tax credit portions of the bill.