Advice

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July 2016 is the target date for the Department of Labor’s final regulations that increase the guaranteed weekly salary employees must earn to be considered exempt employees under the Fair Labor Standards Act.
Congress’ retroactive reinstatement of parity between mass transit benefits and employer-provided parking is no favor to Payroll.
Odds are your company has a website. If you’re thinking of enhancing that website, say, with employee-written blogs, be careful. A federal trial court provided a stark reminder of the Fair Labor Standards Act’s rule that nonexempts can’t volunteer any time to their employers when it ruled that a nonexempt who volunteered to write a company blog can pursue her claim for unpaid overtime.
Just how far does Payroll have to go to accommodate an employee or job applicant’s religious beliefs under Title VII, the federal antidiscrimination law?
Last fall, the IRS launched a new pilot program, called the Early Interaction Initiative. This initiative is designed to help employers catch up on their payment and reporting responsibilities.
The IRS has released guidance covering an assortment of issues under the Affordable Care Act, including how certain cafeteria plan flex contributions affect affordability, adjustments to the affordability safe harbors and penalty relief for failing to file correct Forms 1095-C/1094-C or 1095-B/1094-B.
Groundhogs scurry back home after they see their shadows. You have no such luxury. Paper W-2s are due to the Social Security Administration by the end of the month; e-filed forms are due by March 31. This checklist applies to e-filers who are using the SSA’s EFW2 filing specs.
The IRS is a prodigious publisher. Here are digests of two Legal Memoranda.
An employer that failed to prove it filed its Forms W-2/W-3 with the Social Security Administration was, nevertheless, not liable for a tax penalty for intentionally disregarding the filing requirement. This may be a comfort if you’re filing paper W-2s/W-3, which are due to the SSA by the end of the month.