Advice

September 4–8 is National Payroll Week. That’s the week that everyone, from the lowest-level employee to those in the boardroom, should express their appreciation for the 100% spot-on job Payroll does.
The IRS has announced the 2018 inflation-adjusted figures for health savings accounts and high-deductible health plans.
Legislation enacted in 2015 requires the U.S. State Department, upon certification from the IRS, to revoke the passports of taxpayers who have seriously delinquent tax debts. That may be a problem for employers. Employees who can’t take overseas business trips are employees who aren’t productive. Such drastic measures may need an equally drastic response from the Payroll department.
An employer that honored a lock-in letter and a wage levy from the IRS isn’t liable to the employee for doing so, a federal trial court has ruled.
IRS … IRS, who? Phone scams involving the IRS are so common that it has become a reflex to hang up the phone before the robocaller is even finished with the initial spiel. But what if someone knocks on your company’s door, flashes what looks like an official ID and says they’re from the IRS? How do you know for sure?

Mickey and Minnie have gotten their due. The Department of Labor has announced that it has reached an agreement with the Walt Disney Co. to pay $3.8 million in back wages to 16,339 “cast members” who had to pay for “costumes” to be worn at the company’s theme parks.

If you have a health plan, the odds are you’re covered under the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, or HIPAA. The Department of Health and Human Services Office for Civil Rights—the OCR—has become aware of two phishing schemes related to HIPAA.
The credit is taken on Form 941. For calendar year businesses, the first time the credit can be taken is on the second-quarter form, which is due July 31.
Here are digests of some recently released official announcements from around the federal government.
If you can’t pay your back payroll taxes all at once, you may enter into an installment agreement with the IRS and pay them off over time. Bad news: The fees for entering into installment agreements have increased precipitously.