Benefits Law

Three federal agencies—the IRS, the Department of Labor and the Department of Health and Human Services—hold sway over group health plans. Each agency has issued regulations that will affect your group plan.
Double dips are great for ice cream cones, but not group health benefits.
Five states have enacted laws that require certain employers to set up auto-enrollment IRAs for their employees.
The IRS has released final Affordable Care Act information reporting forms—Forms 1095-C, 1094-C and 1095-B—for 2016 information reporting purposes.
Under proposed regulations, if you induce employees to opt out of your group health plan with additional cash compensation, those payments must be added into employees’ monthly premiums.
Wellness plans collect a lot of health information on employees. Which means that they can run headlong into federal antidiscrimination laws, such as the Americans with Disabilities Act and the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act. The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission has issued final regulations on the interaction between wellness plans and these two laws.
The IRS has announced the 2017 inflation adjustments for health savings accounts (HSAs) and high-deductible health plans. It’s also released a series of information letters that clarify HSAs.

ACA odds and ends

June 30, 2016

Releases from the IRS, Department of Health and Human Services and the Department of Labor clarify some finer points under the Affordable Care Act.
As if you didn’t have enough to worry about with withholding and reporting taxes, federal appellate courts have recently chimed in on whether and how ERISA, the federal benefits law, applies to severance pay policies.
If you’re a government contractor that pays the higher minimum wage to nonexempt employees who work on federal contracts, proposed regulations would also have you on the hook to provide seven days of paid sick leave to the same nonexempt employees, and to your exempt employees, too.